Rezension: Lisa Ballantyne: “The Guilty One”

Kids killing other kids: The horror always jolts us because we remember childhood games and giggled secrets, not murder, yet the ugly presence of bullying paints a different reality. In Scottish author Lisa Ballantyne’s harrowing first novel, 8-year-old Ben Stokes is the victim.

Rezension: Mohammed Hanif: “Our Lady of Alice Bhatti”

Alice Bhatti, junior nurse, recently released from 14 months in jail for an unseemly dust-up we’ll only learn about later, applies for a job at the Sacred Heart Hospital for All Ailments, a shambling Catholic institution that can accommodate 7,000 patients at a time.

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Rezension: Bill O’Reilly, Martin Dugard: »Killing Lincoln«

Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard’s book offers »a saga of courage, cowardice and betrayal« with »lessons … relevant to all our lives.«  Those lessons are not entirely clear after reading »Killing Lincoln«, but O’Reilly and Dugard suggest that they involve awareness.

Rezension: Stephen King: »11/22/63«

First, the (possibly) bad news: If you’re expecting Stephen King to provide an alternative history of what America would have been like had John F. Kennedy not been assassinated in Dallas, put those expectations aside.

Rezension: John Grisham: »The Litigators«

Are JG’s titles following a slow ramp to dreariness? The muted menace of »The Firm« and »The Client« has given way to such spine-tinglers as »The Broker« and now »The Litigators«. With a chill of foreboding, I await »The Trademark and Copyright Specialists«.

Rezension: Richard Stevenson: »Red White Black and Blue«

Bruises afflict nearly everyone and everything in Richard Stevenson’s 12th Donald Strachey mystery. Hired thugs pummel Strachey, a gay Albany PI, as he tries to get the dirt on Louderbush, a candidate for governor of New York running in the Democratic primary.

Rezension: Laura Lippman: »The Most Dangerous Thing«

Maybe »The most dangerous thing« isn’t the specter of bogeymen in the woods or old companions who can’t keep their mouths shut; maybe »The most dangerous thing« turns out to be the relentless passage of time.

Rezension: Zoran Drvenkar »Sorry«

A man whose name we do not know knocks on the door of a woman who also remains anonymous. She recognizes the visitor and invites him in. After a bit of small talk, he renders her unconscious and drives her to an apartment, where he nails her hands to the wall.